Monday, November 30, 2015

Contemplation


Whenever I undertake a woodworking, or other, project I seem to spend a lot of time just standing there, looking at the early phases of construction or the plans.  Thinking about what I eventually want to do or change with the design, or working out a difficult section. There is usually lots of doodling and sketching on yellow legal pads everywhere (note to self - I need a big white board).

I often do the same thing with other difficult personal decisions - sitting on them if you will for a while, hoping for some eventual inspiration.  It often comes when I'm not actually expecting it, such as during a swim (a great place for working out issues) or a bike ride.

The same goes for this dory build.  I've probably spent more time staring at the plans or the boat, trying to figure out how I want to attack the (insert transom, bow post, bulkheads, footwell, seats, whatever, here) than physically building.  Right now the decking and hatch frames & gutters are getting a lot of my attention. Especially b/c I've modified Andy's plans quite a bit.  First from just some simple slight variations in measurement & cutting,  which can grow over the course of a big boat. A quarter of an inch here, or a half there, can add up to a solid number over 16'9".  But more from conscious decisions to change the way I want my final boat to fit me - in the footwell dimensions, size of the seats and seat backs, slope angle of the hatch lids toward center, size of bow and stern hatches, etc...).  This of course leads to dramatic changes in all of the decking dimensions.

That's fine, I made the choice and will live with it.  But it requires a new emphasis on accurate measurements and use of cheaper (cardboard) templates. Big pieces. So I've been dumpster diving the local furniture and appliance stores.

Then there's the hatch gutters.  There are easy and hard ways to do these.  The basic requirements are to securely close the hatch lids and try to get most (all) of the water off the lids & deck and down into the oarsman or passenger footwells, and then out via drains.  Typically this is done by gutters which sit below the level of the hatch lid, which is separated from the gutter and hopefully the majority of the water by some type of a weatherstrip seal.

Here's one cross-section option:




So for now, I'm going to go get some coffee, head up to the couch and maybe watch some football and take a nap.  Looking for some subconscious inspiration.



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